Information - Concepts In Nutrigenomics - Diet And Gene Expression

Diet alters expression of genetic information

Dietary chemicals have been shown to alter gene expression in a number of ways. For example, they may:

  • act as ligands for transcription factor receptors
  • be metabolized by primary or secondary metabolic pathways thereby altering concentrations of substrates or intermediates or
  • alter signal transduction pathways

Exogenous nutrients can affect gene expression directly (A) or indirectly (B and C in Figure). This was convincingly demonstrated by comprehensive investigation of yeast gene expression using microarrays.  A diauxic shift from fermentation respiration resulted in, metabolic reprogramming that identified genes previously unassociated with nutrient utilization. Although more complex than yeast, we believe the constellation of genes that make up the human genome respond in a similar fashion to the dietary chemicals.

Further reading

Guo, S and Sonenshein, G.  (2006)  Green Tea Polyphenols and Cancer Prevention. In Nutritional Genomics: Discovering the Path to Personalized Nutrition.  Kaput, J and Rodriguz, R (eds). Wiley and Sons, Inc. NY. 2006. pp 175 - 206.

Kaput, J. and Rodriguez, RL.  2004. Nutritional genomics: the next frontier in the postgenomic era.  Physiological Genomics 16, 166 - 177 (free access)

Magbuana, MJM, Dawson, K, Huang, L, Malyj, W, Gregg, J, Galvez, A, and Rodriguez, RL (2006) Nutrient - gene Interactions Involving Soy Peptide and Chemopreventive Epithelial Cells In Nutritional Genomics: Discovering the Path to Personalized Nutrition.  Kaput, J and Rodriguz, R (eds). Wiley and Sons, Inc. NY. 2006. pp 255 - 276.

Schuster, GU.  (2006) Nutrients and Gene Expression.   In Nutritional Genomics: Discovering the Path to Personalized Nutrition.  Kaput, J and Rodriguz, R (eds). Wiley and Sons, Inc. NY. 2006. pp 153 - 173